Buying and Displaying Tips: Landscape Prints

    Firstly, you need to love it. If you don’t enjoy the art you buy and own what is the point? If the print is something you enjoy seeing then buy it to see it on your wall all the time. Having a connection with the landscape whether you have been there or just like the way it was conveyed is important.

    When purchasing landscape photography for walls look for a couple of things in the art you want the room to connect with. Good art will have a mood to it along with some sort of story you can see in the print. If you don’t like feeling cold in a room it might not be a good idea to display a blue winter image there.

 A crude example of how I lit my booth with metal prints.

A crude example of how I lit my booth with metal prints.

    When displaying any type of art it is important to consider the light. If the room is bright with lots of window light you will want to avoid extremely glossy prints. Also connected to this is how you light the print separate from the rest of the room. It is a very good idea to install track lighting on its own to control the brightness of the works making them ‘pop’. Face mount acrylics are a great example of a print material that does infinitely better when lit properly.

    Look for the right material for putting on display. A metal print like the ones I sell look incredible, but they might not fit well in a rustic room. If you like something more classic it is a good idea to look for a paper print in a frame like the Hahnemuehle Photo Rag. 

    There is also the act of collecting art. Many will start out collecting from those who are considered “Emerging Artists” because the works have potential to grow in value over time. If you are looking at art from a bigger name be careful if you don't know much about them already. My landscape photography fits this category as I am new to the art scene and many of my limited editions are still very new.

    Looking for small editions of 50 or less is another important thing to look for. The idea behind this is art is more valuable when it is rare. All of my fine art prints are in editions of 42 or less. My “Trinity” piece is a run of only 3 in the edition making it significantly more valuable in its rarity.

 This is Trinity which will only ever be printed 3 times.

This is Trinity which will only ever be printed 3 times.