tips

Photographing Slot Canyons

Photographing Slot Canyons

When shooting in a slot canyon for the first time it can be an exciting time. All of the excitement and countless compositions create an overwhelming feeling from the moment you step through the narrow threshold. It can really help to hone in on some more simple concepts in order to avoid becoming the photographer who holds down the shutter button hoping to capture something nice.

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How to take care of Fine Art.

How to take care of Fine Art.

It is exciting to buy and display new art! Having something you love the look of and connect with is wonderful and you are going to want to protect that. For this reason, I wanted to talk a bit about how to keep your fine art prints protected from fading, damage, and overall preservation.

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Buying and Displaying Tips: Landscape Prints

Buying and Displaying Tips: Landscape Prints

When purchasing landscape photography for walls look for a couple of things in the art you want the room to connect with.

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Composing Waterfall Images

Composing Waterfall Images

Shooting Waterfall Photos is not something easy to do in a consistently compelling way. Having been able to live in the PNW for a little while I have compiled a list of tips for success and when/where to use them around these majestic pieces in nature! Along the way are some examples of what I consider to be my best waterfall works as examples.

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Focus Stacking for Sharpness - 10 Tips for Success

 Focus Stacking for Sharpness - 10 Tips for Success

Focus stacking is an intermediate technique used in the field and in post to capture landscape images with incredible sharpness that you could not attain in a single image. It is typically used to create maximum sharpness when shooting with wide-angle lenses extremely close to the subject in the foreground. Sometimes within a couple inches from the bottom of the frame, even the smallest apertures would not physically be able to capture sharp images from front to back.

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Jonsrud Viewpoint Sunrise - Planned w/ PhotoPills

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A little planning goes a long way in landscape photography. I'm not sponsored or anything by PhotoPills, but I must say their app is fantastic if you ever want to plan out a shoot in advance or just wonder if things will ever align just right for an image. Literally everything is in there to plan out your trip and you can answer just about any question you might have about shooting including equipment, framing, and the alignments of the stars according to your surroundings. I could literally go on for ever, but I'll spare you all that. If you want to know more, check them out at http://www.photopills.com 

The image I shot this morning was planned out well in advance as it all started with a simple question. Does the sun ever rise right over Mt. Hood? The answer was inevitably yes and with that, I had to go! Wednesday was technically the best day with near perfect alignment, but I had work and Thursday would work out almost as well for the shot I had in mind. I have visited this location once before to scout it out when the conditions were much less than ideal giving me the vision for what I wanted the image to be. 

The moment the sun appeared around the mountain.

The moment the sun appeared around the mountain.

I did not know how the actual light conditions would behave. As the sun rose it created a weird shadow above the peak that moved with the sun. It was truly a bizarre event as it rotated opposite of the sun around the peak. The other thing was just how quickly the sun would move across the scene while I shot. I knew the exact minute it would appear, but what I didn't know is that I had about 10-15 seconds to shoot before it was too large and flaring more than I would like. I got the shot in the end though, and what an image it is when processed and finished!

Taken just a couple seconds after the sun had originally appeared. The flare had already grown a substantial amount to the size I had envisioned when planning.

Taken just a couple seconds after the sun had originally appeared. The flare had already grown a substantial amount to the size I had envisioned when planning.