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Letting the Mind Wander

Letting the Mind Wander

When practicing photography it isn’t always easy to compose and capture great images that are uniquely yours. Of course you will need good light and interesting subjects, but this isn’t the whole story.

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Learning from Bad Photography

Learning from Bad Photography

It is important to fail. We all have taken bad images before. Everybody has done something cringe-worthy in their processing one time or another. Nobody has a perfect portfolio of images that they love from years prior.

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Why I try not to crop.

Why I try not to crop.

There are are several good reasons to avoid cropping in on images. While it may be acceptable and a valuable part of photography for some (namely wildlife shooters). I do the best I can to get the image just right in camera when shooting my landscapes.

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How to take care of Fine Art.

How to take care of Fine Art.

It is exciting to buy and display new art! Having something you love the look of and connect with is wonderful and you are going to want to protect that. For this reason, I wanted to talk a bit about how to keep your fine art prints protected from fading, damage, and overall preservation.

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Composing Waterfall Images

Composing Waterfall Images

Shooting Waterfall Photos is not something easy to do in a consistently compelling way. Having been able to live in the PNW for a little while I have compiled a list of tips for success and when/where to use them around these majestic pieces in nature! Along the way are some examples of what I consider to be my best waterfall works as examples.

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Focus Stacking for Sharpness - 10 Tips for Success

 Focus Stacking for Sharpness - 10 Tips for Success

Focus stacking is an intermediate technique used in the field and in post to capture landscape images with incredible sharpness that you could not attain in a single image. It is typically used to create maximum sharpness when shooting with wide-angle lenses extremely close to the subject in the foreground. Sometimes within a couple inches from the bottom of the frame, even the smallest apertures would not physically be able to capture sharp images from front to back.

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